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The Pacific Rim, a 60-foot commercial fishing vessel homeported in Westport, Wash., lies partially submerged near the Westport Marina in Grays Harbor, Oct. 23, 2016. The Coast Guard rescued the only person aboard and transferred him to emergency medical services. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Beresh.
On October 23, 2016, at 3:51 AM, Coast Guard Sector Columbia River received a mayday call. It was Michael Carroll, 70-year-old captain of the 60-foot fishing vessel Pacific Rim, which had begun to sink under him outside the Westport Marina.

If this vessel name sounds familiar, it’s because back in 2012 it ran aground near Coos Bay, OR in the midst of a thick fog. This time, it hit a submerged object and began sinking.

Upon receiving the call that “the vessel was taking on water”, an MLB crew was promptly launched and reached Carroll at 4:15 AM, rescuing him onto a 47-foot Motor Life Boat. Next he was transferred to Westport Marina’s emergency medical services, then relocated to Grays Harbor Community Hospital with symptoms of hypothermia.

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LakeCrescentCoastGuardStudents and chaperones from Stevens Middle School in Port Angeles, Washington were rescued from Camp David Jr. on Crescent Lake by the U.S. Coast Guard on Friday, October 14th.  According to the Coast Guard, Sector Puget Sound received a call at approximately 3:45 p.m. reporting that 40 kids and 6 adults were stranded without power in a cabin at the popular Clallam County Camp. Due to high winds and fallen trees, David Junior Road was impassable by vehicle, blocking all access to U.S. Highway 101.

The Coast Guard responded quickly, assisted by deputies from the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office.

“With that amount of kids there, and the fact that emergency services could only get to them by boat, the decision was made to go out there and boat them over before the major storm hit on Saturday,” said Clallam County Chief Criminal Deputy Brian King.

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TaplowFive fishermen were rescued by the US Coast Guard on Friday, October 7th, 2016 when a 56-foot commercial fishing vessel began taking on water. The Taplow was about 19 miles southwest of Grays Harbor, Washington when the Coast Guard Sector Columbia River received the distress call that the vessel was taking on water. The captain reported that the engine room was half flooded, and pumps had stopped working.

An Urgent Marine Information Broadcast was issued and the Motor Lifeboat Invincible was dispatched, as well as a MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter and crew. The crew was directed to activate their Electronic Position Indicating Radio Beacon and put on immersion suits.

The Grays Harbor helicopter crew was first to arrive on the scene, delivering a pump and standing by until a second helicopter crew arrived. A rescue swimmer was deployed to assist with dewatering until the Motor Lifeboat Invincible and crew arrived. With the fishing vessel listing sideways, the MLB crew advised the fishermen aboard the Taplow to abandon ship.

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2 Sailor Cold BayTwo sailors arrived in Kodiak on Wednesday, September 28th, 2016 seeking medical treatment due to the sinking of the sailboat Rafiki.

The men were sailing 230 miles south of Cold Bay, in 7 mph winds and 6-foot seas, when the engine compartment began to fill with water. They contacted Coast Guard 14th District in Honolulu, who transferred the call to Coast Guard 17th District in Juneau.  The Rising Sun, a nearby vessel, was diverted toward the Rafiki as backup.  The sailors were instructed to activate and remain with their EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon), and with the vessel, until evacuation was absolutely necessary.

A HC-130 Hercules long-range aircraft arrived promptly at the scene and dropped survival suits to the sailors, who were then rescued by a MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter for transport to Sand Point. There, the Hercules picked them up for transport to the hospital.

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Earnest Tug Boat
The Oregon State Department of Environmental Quality and the US Coast Guard responded to an 82-foot sunken tug at 8:49pm on the evening of Sunday, September 25th. The Earnest, a wooden-hulled vessel, sank on the Columbia River in Goble, OR. The incident was reported via the National Response Center.

Divers from Ballard Diving were contracted by the Incident Management Division in Portland to assess and address any fuel or other sources of pollution which may have been present after the sinking.

Clay Jonak, the owner of the Earnest, reported the vessel was carrying approximately 100 gallons of residual diesel fuel when it sank in Columbia County. Several other older tugs and barges are owned by Jonak, which he is attempting to salvage and scrap.

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Seacrest_Park_Seattle_WA_DivingThe 22-year-old student diver who was rescued near Seacrest Park in West Seattle on August 28th, has died.

The police report states that visibility underwater was very poor. Divers were signaled to surface, and all three divers in the class gave a “thumbs up” sign, indicating that they understood. However, upon reaching the surface, only two students were accounted for; the instructor was unable to locate the third student diver and 911 was dispatched.

The missing student diver was found approximately 30 minutes later in 69 feet of water. She was brought to the surface and medics performed CPR. Seattle Fire Medic 32 rushed the woman to Harborview Medical Center. She died shortly after 2:30pm.

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A 20-year old student diver in critical condition was rescued off Alki Beach in West Seattle on August 28, 2016. According to Seattle Fire Department (SFD) Captain Shata Stephenson, the diver “was within her first five dives.” An initial investigation indicates that she was paired with a partner and they became disoriented while diving.   The partner surfaced, expecting that the other diver would, too, but she did not. She was missing in 40 feet of water for about 30 minutes before SFD divers found her and brought her to a SFD boat. A Coast Guard helicopter flew her to Harborview Medical Center.

The diving accident was assisted by the US Coast Guard, SFD, Seattle Police Harbor Patrol, and members of the diving class.

IMG_5304-e1472417609881-652x489                                                    photo credit to Seattle Times

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At around 10:30 a.m. at Terminal 46 on Alaskan Way South, a loader overturned, trapping the 50-year-old driver inside the cab. Seattle Fire Department responded by 11:00 a.m. and after about 15 minutes, the rescue was successful.

SFD reported that the man suffered minor injuries and was taken to Harborview Medical Center for evaluation and treatment.

Fire Capt. Shata Stephenson did not know how the incident occurred, though the loader appeared to have overturned and hurled the vehicle’s cab into the air while lifting a heavy load.

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At 11:54 a.m. on Sunday, August 14, watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector North Bend received a mayday call from 60-foot F/V McCALIS about 8 miles west of Cape Blanco, Oregon. The crew reported that their vessel was taking on water through the fish hold and the dewatering pumps were not keeping up. The three fishermen aboard the vessel also announced their intention to abandon ship onto a liferaft.

The Coast Guard launched a 47-foot Motor Lifeboat Crew from Search and Rescue Detachment Coquille River and an aircrew aboard an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter. Both crews arrived to the scene around 1:15 p.m., but with only 300-feet of visibility due to fog, the boat crew picked up the fishermen from their liferaft.

The three fishermen aboard the McCALIS are reportedly uninjured, and en route to Station Coos Bay in Charleston, Oregon.

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The 751-foot cargo vessel reportedly ran aground near Skamokawa, Washington at 7:49 p.m. on Friday evening. It then refloated, traveled a few miles upstream and grounded again while at anchor.

The Coast Guard conducted an overflight of the grounded motor vessel Friday night, and will arrange another as weather conditions permit.

As of 7:40 a.m. on Saturday, the vessel had refloated with the tide, leaving no indication of discharged pollution.