Articles Posted in Coast Guard Rescue

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The US Coast Guard rescued three commercial fishermen on Sunday morning after their fishing vessel COASTAL REIGN began taking on water. The crew reported that their vessel struck a submerged object as they navigated the mouth of the Columbia River.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Columbia received the captain’s mayday call (listen here) at 3:20 a.m. An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter was launched, and first to arrive on the scene at 3:38 a.m. A 47-foot motor life boat from Ilwaco, Washington arrived shortly thereafter, and assisted with the dewatering of the fishing vessel.

The dewatered vessel was then towed to safety and moored at 4:40 a.m.

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706062-300x206January 6 was a tough day for the F/V GUDNY and Coast Guard Cutter SPAR, both disabled 230 miles east-southeast of Kodiak, Alaska.  Fortunately, the four fishermen off the 87’ LADY GUDNY were airlifted by a Coast Guard helicopter crew and safely flown to Kodiak.

What happened? At 1:43 a.m. the Kodiak Coast Guard received a distress call from the F/V LADY GUDNY requesting fuel filters because the engine had failed and they were adrift. At 7:30 am, they called again to say they could not restart the engine. Weather was reported as 20-22 foot seas with 49 mph winds – see the photo above. The helicopter crew flew out and airlifted the fishermen off the boat, and the 225’ Coast Guard Cutter SPAR arrived to tow the LADY GUDNY to Kodiak. Unfortunately, the towline parted and tangled in the SPAR’s propeller, disabling the SPAR. Lines tangled in propellers are a nightmare for any vessel size. The commercial tugs ANNA-T and CHAHUNTA ended up towing the SPAR AND LADY GUDNY to Kodiak.

Here are two Coast Guard statements about the LADY GUDNY:

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27-Foot-Crab-Boat-300x225On December 31st at 3:05 p.m. the Coast Guard Sector Puget Sound received a distress call from a mariner aboard a 27-foot crab boat that was disabled and adrift in the shoals of Bellingham Bay. The mariner was safely removed from his vessel by the crew aboard a 45-foot Response Boat-Medium at 4:13 p.m. The mariner was listed in good health and did not require medical attention.

When the mariner called for help, he was disoriented and unable to give his exact location to Coast Guard personnel. Thankfully, his location was established using the GPS signal from his cell phone.

“The Coast Guard encourages mariners to carry a VHF-FM radio aboard their vessels,” said Don Knesebeck, a command duty officer at Coast Guard 13th District Command Center. “Even if cell phones have a GPS transmitter, tracking down a cell phone is an involved process. Calling 911 with a cell phone should not be ruled out in case of an emergency but using a radio for distress calls is the best possible way to get the help you need, faster.”

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Leann-FV-300x239The captain of the 75-foot F/V LEANN reported that a crewmember fell and suffered a head injury while fishing more than 20 miles off Florence, Oregon. The call to the Coos Bay, Oregon Coast Guard came in just after midnight on December 15, 2016. The captain reported that the injured man was first knocked unconscious, but when he woke he was combative.

The Coast Guard flew a helicopter crew to the vessel, lowered a rescue swimmer to prepare for the lift, hoisted the injured man into the MH-65 Dolphin, and flew him to the Bay Area Hospital in Coos Bay, Oregon.

Weather on scene was calm and clear with light winds.Coast-Guard-300x238

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The U.S. Coast Guard began a two-week public Formal Marine Investigation today to determine the cause of the sinking of the 220-foot fishing vessel, ALASKA JURIS. The vessel sank off Alaska’s Aleutian Islands on July 26th.

Efforts were made to locate the sunken vessel by the Coast Guard, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, and The Fishing Company of Alaska, but the vessel was never found. The ALASKA JURIS sank in approximately 5,400 feet of water, and its last known location was about 41 miles northeast of Segula Island.

The Seventeenth Coast Guard District commander will be holding the two weeks of hearings at the Henry Jackson Federal Building in Seattle. Testimony will be streamed live and can be seen at Livestream.

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ASTORIA, Ore. - A Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew from Air Station Astoria, search for a man overboard dummy during a training exercise with the Columbia River Bar Pilots west of the Columbia River entrance, Nov. 8, 2010. The Coast Guard and Columbia River Bar Pilots began conducting the semi-annual joint drill in 2009 and continue to practice man overboard retrieval techniques to ensure that procedures for locating a person in the water will run smoothly as the two forces work together.U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nate Littlejohn
On November 26th, 2016  the Coast Guard rescued an injured crew member more than 170 miles offshore from the Columbia River. The 23-year-old man was aboard the 617-foot Global Saikai, which had left Longview, WA for Kashima, Japan carrying a load of timber.

Coast Guard Sector Columbia River received the call after the crew member fell from a ladder and broke his arm. An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew was launched from Warrenton, OR to transfer the man to emergency medical personnel, who in turn took him to Columbia Memorial Hospital in Astoria, OR.

Weather at the scene was reported as raining with light wind, 13 foot seas and 9 mile visibility.

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The Pacific Rim, a 60-foot commercial fishing vessel homeported in Westport, Wash., lies partially submerged near the Westport Marina in Grays Harbor, Oct. 23, 2016. The Coast Guard rescued the only person aboard and transferred him to emergency medical services. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Beresh.
On October 23, 2016, at 3:51 AM, Coast Guard Sector Columbia River received a mayday call. It was Michael Carroll, 70-year-old captain of the 60-foot fishing vessel Pacific Rim, which had begun to sink under him outside the Westport Marina.

If this vessel name sounds familiar, it’s because back in 2012 it ran aground near Coos Bay, OR in the midst of a thick fog. This time, it hit a submerged object and began sinking.

Upon receiving the call that “the vessel was taking on water”, an MLB crew was promptly launched and reached Carroll at 4:15 AM, rescuing him onto a 47-foot Motor Life Boat. Next he was transferred to Westport Marina’s emergency medical services, then relocated to Grays Harbor Community Hospital with symptoms of hypothermia.

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LakeCrescentCoastGuardStudents and chaperones from Stevens Middle School in Port Angeles, Washington were rescued from Camp David Jr. on Crescent Lake by the U.S. Coast Guard on Friday, October 14th.  According to the Coast Guard, Sector Puget Sound received a call at approximately 3:45 p.m. reporting that 40 kids and 6 adults were stranded without power in a cabin at the popular Clallam County Camp. Due to high winds and fallen trees, David Junior Road was impassable by vehicle, blocking all access to U.S. Highway 101.

The Coast Guard responded quickly, assisted by deputies from the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office.

“With that amount of kids there, and the fact that emergency services could only get to them by boat, the decision was made to go out there and boat them over before the major storm hit on Saturday,” said Clallam County Chief Criminal Deputy Brian King.